Latin America

2020 “Covid-Closures: When School Cancellation Means Return to a War Zone/Cierres por Covid: Cuando la cancelación de la escuela significa el regreso a una zona de guerra.” ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America. 5/20. Available at: https://revista.drclas.harvard.edu/book/covid-closures?admin_panel=1

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Summary: This article explores the effects caused by forced closures of schools during the pandemic in Oaxaca, Mexico. Students had, pre-Covid, thought of school as a safe harbor that let them get away from the violent politics that constituted a form of civil war in their hometowns. The closures brought renewed senses of uncertainty and physical insecurity to students and families alike, many living in areas rife with conflict.

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2020 “Landmark femicide case fails to fix El Salvador’s patriarchy.” The Globe Post. 2/6/20. Available at: https://theglobepost.com/2020/02/06/femicides-el-salvador/

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Summary: This op-ed discusses the noteworthy conviction by a Salvadoran judge, in which Mario Huezo was given the maximum sentence of 50 years in prison for the 2018 killing of Salvadoran journalist Karla Turcio.  The article links this landmark case to systemic misogyny and the fight for women’s rights in El Salvador.  It not only explores the history of male privilege in the country, but also details the oftentimes insufficient legislative measures to counteract this imbalance.

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2020 “Deported to death: US sent 138 Salvadorans home to be killed.” The Conversation. 2/6/20. Available at: https://theconversation.com/deported-to-death-us-sent-138-salvadorans-home-to-be-killed-131345

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Summary: This article, based on findings by the Human Rights Watch report detailing the crisis, gives an in-depth look at people who were deported from the US to El Salvador and who were later killed upon returning to El Salvador.  The article examines the history of violence in El Salvador and the resulting human rights crises that continue to displace large numbers of immigrants and refugees.

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2019 “US will send migrants to El Salvador, a country that can’t protect its own people.” The Conversation. 10/10/19. Available at: https://theconversation.com/us-will-send-migrants-to-el-salvador-a-country-that-cant-protect- its-own-people-124475

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Summary: This short article dives deeper into El Salvador’s history of violence, paying special attention to human security and human rights law. It explores how recent US laws, signed in agreement with many states whose populations seek asylum in the US, have resulted in denied access to asylum in the US, and even forced returns to countries of origin.

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2019 "The Trump administration keeps making it harder to claim asylum. Here’s how — and why." The Monkey Cage. 8/15/19.

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Summary: Attorney General William P. Barr made it harder for immigrants to claim asylum in the United States. He ruled in 2019 that asylum will no longer be granted to people who fear persecution because criminal gangs have threatened members of their family, partially reversing a federal Board of Immigration Appeals determination. Barr ruled that membership in a family no longer qualifies as belonging to a “particular social group,” a bureaucratic term meaning a persecuted group whose members can claim asylum. Here’s what you need to know about Barr’s ruling.

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2014 “Insurgents and advocates: women’s claim-making in El Salvador.” Book chapter in Cuerpo, educación y liderazgo político: una mirada desde el género y los estudios feministas/Bodies, education and political leadership: a gender and feminist perspective. Ed. Sara Poggio and María Amelia Viteri. FLACSO, Quito, Ecuador, pages 37-64.

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Summary: This chapter addresses forms of female participation in state claim-making processes in El Salvador, and through vignettes based on testimonials and fieldwork, shows how violence informs those processes.  By focusing on women who were active during the war and therefore exposed to violence perpetuated by the state, this chapter locates the way in which this violence facilitated renegotiation of rights between the citizens and the state.

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